Let’s talk a little about problems shall we. The problem that we might perceive, be it in a relationship, at work or in life is usually the symptom of a larger issue. In many cases it may be an opportunity for growth. When we are able to “grow through” our “problems” we become better as a result of them. With this perspective, we can begin to reclaim our power. The power we give up when we perceive a problem to be overwhelming and out of our control. There are, of course, things that we cannot control, but how it affects us is usually something we are able to influence.

When we consider health challenges or problems, we may need to adjust our perception regarding what is actually going on. In school we talked about what the proper response to a fire alarm should be. A professor of ours once compared symptom treatment to the fire department busting down the door, smashing the fire alarm and then leaving when there is still smoke in the house. Don’t get me wrong, symptom treatment is often a life-saving and extremely necessary part of proper medical care. I just want to illustrate the point that removing the symptom of a problem does not necessary mean that the cause has been resolved. Dr. Epstein, the founder and developer of Network Spinal, poses the question of: when you step on a dog’s tail, where does the bark come out? The point is that the location of the problem is often somewhere other than where we notice symptoms or warning signs.

The body is always working to adapt and sometimes it doesn’t look pretty. Remember what happens when you eat some bad food. What happens? You get sick, you throw up or you might get diarrhea. The question is: Should we fight against the body, or help it adapt? What about other times when we encountered a challenging situation and we had to adapt? Have you ever had a situation that you were not sure how to handle and you had to develop a new strategy specific to that situation? The next time a similar thing happens, you will know what to do because you’ve been there before.

When we consider health challenges or problems, we may need to adjust our perception regarding what is actually going on. In school we talked about what the proper response to a fire alarm should be. A professor of ours once compared symptom treatment to the fire department busting down the door, smashing the fire alarm and then leaving when Most people like surprises. Surprises that we don’t want we call problems. If we shift our perception regarding problems, we can usually find a way to master the situation. I want to encourage you to first take a step back the next time something unexpected happens. Ask yourself for what this might be good for and work on conquering the uncharted territory. You might just find that you discover great opportunity amongst the chaos of the situation. After you successfully navigate the situation, actively celebrate your win. Here’s to the new and more resourceful version of you.

Joy-fully Yours,

Linda